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The Louisiana Town Devoured by Climate Change

Jul 03, 2014 | Chris Heller

Families have lived on Isle de Jean Charles for generations, fishing in its waters and setting their roots deep into its soil. In recent years, however, the threat of rising sea levels, powerful storms, and coastal erosion—along with the consequences of oil drilling and levee projects—have forced all but a few to leave. The island, one resident tells filmmaker Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee, "is just a skeleton of what it used to be."

To learn more about the plight of Isle de Jean Charles, read these stories by the Times-Picayune, the New York Times, and Newshour.
Courtesy of Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee

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