What's the Last Photo on Your Phone?

A filmmaker convinced these New Yorkers to share their last cellphone photographs.

In an effort to capture the connections between the digital world and our everyday human experiences, interactive artist Ivan Cash asked a group of strangers to share their last cellphone pictures. “I’m fascinated by all of these human stories that are inherently non-curated and unfiltered,” says Cash.

The photos range from a day at the spa to the not-so-pleasant view of the cat's litter box. While the project is inherently based in several different forms of media (video, photography, cellphones), Cash claims his ultimate goal is to push people away from the screen. “I want to live in a world where more people talk to strangers,” says Cash. “Where we’re less glued to our phone, and more open to connecting.” The project is part of a larger video series entitled: Last Photo. Previously, the series visited San Francisco and Los Angeles.

To see more work from Ivan Cash visit his website.

Paul Rosenfeld writes and produces for Atlantic Video. His work has also appeared on The Daily Beast and CNN.com.

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