Getting Off the NSA's Grid: Late-Night Comedy Roundup

Plus: Hamas hires its first female spokesperson, Chris Christie gets new legal representation—and more.

Stephen Colbert has always believed in the National Security Agency's right to spy—especially on other people. But now that new leaks have revealed a vast surveillance network that can even tap computers unconnected to the internet, Colbert is taking a few technological steps back.

Plus: Bridgegate has left Chris Christie to rely on a new legal team.

And in international news, the glass ceiling has been radically broken: Hamas recently signed on its first female spokesperson.

Read more from National Journal.

Reena Flores is a Video Producer at National Journal.

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