Why Do CEOs Make So Much Money?

The world is bigger. So are the stock options.

More

In 1965, the typical CEO at one of America's 500 largest companies made 20x more than his typical worker. Today, she makes more than 200x. What happened? There is a practical answer and a philosophical answer.

First, CEOs are paid more because they're paid differently—with stock and stock options. The trend of paying executives with stock, which surged during the late 1980s and 1990s, has murky origins, but clear consequences: It has made the CEOs of America's biggest companies unfathomably rich, as you can see in the graph below. Theoretically, paying executives with stock aligns their compensation with their performance. Practically, it means they stand to make absurd sums of money when stocks rise.

But the deeper question is: How much is a good CEO of an enormous company worth? And that's just the problem. It's an extremely hard question to answer. Today's largest multinational corporations are bigger, more international, more complicated, and more besieged by global competition than they used to be. Maybe executives should be compensated more for a harder and more consequential job. 

But how much more is impossible to say. CBS CEO Les Moonves is notorious for pulling down pay packages worth more than $60 million. But his company had $14.1 billion in revenue last year. Relative to his median worker's pay, Moonves is a king. But if he's the best in the business, making less than half-a-percent of his company's total revenue doesn't seem so crazy. It's easy to say a $60 million take-home is wrong. It's harder say what number is right.

Jump to comments

Derek Thompson is a senior editor at The Atlantic, where he writes about economics, labor markets, and the entertainment business.

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

Adventures in Legal Weed

Colorado is now well into its first year as the first state to legalize recreational marijuana. How's it going? James Hamblin visits Aspen.


Elsewhere on the web

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Adventures in Legal Weed

Colorado is now well into its first year as the first state to legalize recreational marijuana. How's it going? James Hamblin visits Aspen.

Video

What Makes a Story Great?

The storytellers behind House of CardsandThis American Life reflect on the creative process.

Video

Tracing Sriracha's Origin to Thailand

Ever wonder how the wildly popular hot sauce got its name? It all started in Si Racha.

Video

Where Confiscated Wildlife Ends Up

A government facility outside of Denver houses more than a million products of the illegal wildlife trade, from tigers and bears to bald eagles.

Video

Is Wine Healthy?

James Hamblin prepares to impress his date with knowledge about the health benefits of wine.

Video

The World's Largest Balloon Festival

Nine days, more than 700 balloons, and a whole lot of hot air

Writers

Up
Down

More in Video

Just In