Stop-Motion Face Paint Illustrates the Afterlife

An artist's new film takes us through a "rebirth."

Generally, life after death is a tricky subject to tackle, but in the short film Ruby, artist Emma Allen uses time-lapse images to show her personal rendering of the process. According to Allen, the film is “an animated self-portrait exploring the idea of rebirth and illustrating the transfer of energy from one incarnation to another.” Shot over the course of five days, Allen used stop-frame animation, face paint, and a camera to show her body’s transition to the afterlife. The journey takes Allen from old age, through decomposition, into a budding flower, out into the stars of the solar system, and back towards reincarnation as a new living creature. 

To see more work from Emma Allen visit emmaallen.org or follow her at @imakefings.

Paul Rosenfeld writes and produces for Atlantic Video. His work has also appeared on The Daily Beast and CNN.com.

Does This Child Need Marijuana?

Dravet Syndrome is a severe form of epilepsy that affects children. Could marijuana oils alleviate their seizures?

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Does This Child Need Marijuana?

Inside a family's fight to use marijuana oils to treat epilepsy

Video

A Miniature 1950s Utopia

A reclusive artist built this idealized suburb to grapple with his painful childhood memories.

Video

Why Principals Matter

Nadia Lopez didn't think anybody cared about her school. Then the Internet heard her story.

Video

A History of Contraception

In the 16th century, men used linen condoms laced shut with ribbons.

Video

'A Music That Has No End'

In Spain, a flamenco guitarist hustles to make a modest living.

More in Video

Just In