Stop-Motion Face Paint Illustrates the Afterlife

An artist's new film takes us through a "rebirth."

Generally, life after death is a tricky subject to tackle, but in the short film Ruby, artist Emma Allen uses time-lapse images to show her personal rendering of the process. According to Allen, the film is “an animated self-portrait exploring the idea of rebirth and illustrating the transfer of energy from one incarnation to another.” Shot over the course of five days, Allen used stop-frame animation, face paint, and a camera to show her body’s transition to the afterlife. The journey takes Allen from old age, through decomposition, into a budding flower, out into the stars of the solar system, and back towards reincarnation as a new living creature. 

To see more work from Emma Allen visit emmaallen.org or follow her at @imakefings.

Paul Rosenfeld writes and produces for Atlantic Video. His work has also appeared on The Daily Beast and CNN.com.

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