Inside a Letterpress Studio

Cinema Mercantile explores typographer Bessie Anderson's Brooklyn based studio

In recent years, the world of design has become inextricably tied to computers, but for Bessie Anderson doing all of her work digitally felt disconnected. As a result, she decided to leave the computer for the letterpress. Satisfying her love for typography, she opened B. Impressed in New York City. In this documentary portrait from Cinema Mercantile, Anderson explains her passion for typography, letterpress, and Brooklyn. The video is part of a series focusing on small businesses and handcrafted products. Mike Collins, the director, describes the making of the project in an interview here.

For more work by Cinema Mercantile visit their website

Paul Rosenfeld writes and produces for Atlantic Video. His work has also appeared on The Daily Beast and CNN.com.

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