Inside a Letterpress Studio

Cinema Mercantile explores typographer Bessie Anderson's Brooklyn based studio

In recent years, the world of design has become inextricably tied to computers, but for Bessie Anderson doing all of her work digitally felt disconnected. As a result, she decided to leave the computer for the letterpress. Satisfying her love for typography, she opened B. Impressed in New York City. In this documentary portrait from Cinema Mercantile, Anderson explains her passion for typography, letterpress, and Brooklyn. The video is part of a series focusing on small businesses and handcrafted products. Mike Collins, the director, describes the making of the project in an interview here.

For more work by Cinema Mercantile visit their website

Paul Rosenfeld writes and produces for Atlantic Video. His work has also appeared on The Daily Beast and CNN.com.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

What Happened to the Milky Way?

Light pollution has taken away our ability to see the stars. Can we still save the night sky?

Video

The Faces of #BlackLivesMatter

Scenes from a recent protest in New York City

Video

Desegregated, Yet Unequal

A short documentary about the legacy of Boston busing

Video

Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Life

The Supreme Court justice talks gender equality and marriage.

Video

Social Media: The Video Game

What if the validation of your peers could "level up" your life?

Video

The Pentagon's $1.5 Trillion Mistake

The F-35 fighter jet was supposed to do everything. Instead, it can barely do anything.

More in Video

Just In