What It Looks Like to BASE Jump Off Mt. Everest

Valery Rozov's record-breaking dive

To mark the 60th anniversary of the first successful ascent of Mount Everest, Russian daredevil Valery Rozov decided to descend -- in a pretty dramatic fashion.

He donned a wingsuit, jumped off the mountain at 7,220 meters (23,687.7 feet) above sea level, and took a terrifying swoon through the air before landing on a glacier.

During his minute-long flight, the 48-year-old reached speeds of up to 125 miles an hour. It was, according to various reports, the highest base jump ever .

How does one gear up for a leap this epic? Rozov has reportedly performed more than 10,000 such jumps, and he prepared for this one by jumping into an active volcano in Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula in 2009, off of the Ulvetanna Peak in the Antarctic in 2010, and from the Shivling mountain in the Himalayas in 2012.

Olga Khazan is a staff writer at The Atlantic, where she covers health.

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