The World's Tiniest Movie

You thought Marcel the Shell was small? *Atoms* animate a new film from IBM.

More

There's Marcel the Shell small, and then there's atomic-level small. A new movie from researchers at IBM falls in the latter camp, having been magnified about 100 million times just to be viewable. According to the BBC, "It would take about 1,000 of the frames of the film laid side by side to span a single human hair."

While its tiny size is a marvel, the stop-motion film is not much of a film, per se. It's got some cute music and a barebones plot-line, sure, but that's not why you're watching; you're watching it because of the amazing fact that it was exists at all -- that people are able to make a movie this tiny. And how did they do that? In a companion video, also released by IBM, the team explains explains how, and why, they took on this project, complete with a tour of the -436 degree Fahrenheit "set."

Jump to comments

Rebecca J. Rosen is a senior editor at The Atlantic, where she oversees the Business Channel. She was previously an associate editor at The Wilson Quarterly.

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

What Crazy Tech Idea Could Become Real?

"There could be great intelligence enhancements, like infinite memory."


Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

A Time-Lapse of Alaska's Northern Lights

The beauty of aurora borealis, as seen from America's last frontier

Video

What Do You Wish You Learned in College?

Ivy League academics reveal their undergrad regrets

Video

Famous Movies, Reimagined

From Apocalypse Now to The Lord of the Rings, this clever video puts a new spin on Hollywood's greatest hits.

Video

What Is a City?

Cities are like nothing else on Earth.

Video

CrossFit Versus Yoga: Choose a Side

How a workout becomes a social identity

Video

In Online Dating, Everyone's a Little Bit Racist

The co-founder of OKCupid shares findings from his analysis of millions of users' data.

Writers

Up
Down

More in Video

Just In