The World's Tiniest Movie

You thought Marcel the Shell was small? *Atoms* animate a new film from IBM.

There's Marcel the Shell small, and then there's atomic-level small. A new movie from researchers at IBM falls in the latter camp, having been magnified about 100 million times just to be viewable. According to the BBC, "It would take about 1,000 of the frames of the film laid side by side to span a single human hair."

While its tiny size is a marvel, the stop-motion film is not much of a film, per se. It's got some cute music and a barebones plot-line, sure, but that's not why you're watching; you're watching it because of the amazing fact that it was exists at all -- that people are able to make a movie this tiny. And how did they do that? In a companion video, also released by IBM, the team explains explains how, and why, they took on this project, complete with a tour of the -436 degree Fahrenheit "set."

Rebecca J. Rosen is a senior editor at The Atlantic, where she oversees the Business Channel. She was previously an associate editor at The Wilson Quarterly.

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