Don't Blame the Sea: Fishing After the Tsunami

A beautiful documentary about one family's determination to survive on the coast of Sri Lanka.

More

In this latest installment from the sustainable food series Perennial Plate, creators Daniel Klein and Mirra Fine tell the story of one small, but resilient, family. As generations before them have done, the men catch fish via nets and poles while the women cook inside the family’s makeshift, one-window hut.

When the 2004 tsunami hit Southeast Asia, they, like many others, were caught in the waves, forced to hold onto trees for survival. Despite losing eight loved ones, the family continues to live at the mercy of the sea. Since the horrific events, they have been unable to catch as many fish as they used to, either because fish are not swimming as close to the shore, or other environmental factors. Whatever the reason, the family is staying put. As one young son says, “we will live with the sea until we die.”

For more from the Perennial Plate, visit their site.

Jump to comments

Alessandra Ram is a former writer and producer for The Atlantic Video Channel. Her work has also appeared in Foreign Policy.

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

This Short Film Skewers Hollywood, Probably Predicts Disney's Next Hit

A studio executive concocts an animated blockbuster. Who cares about the story?


Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

In Online Dating, Everyone's a Little Bit Racist

The co-founder of OKCupid shares findings from his analysis of millions of users' data.

Video

What Is a Sandwich?

We're overthinking sandwiches, so you don't have to.

Video

How Will Climate Change Affect Cities?

Urban planners and environmentalists predict the future of city life.

Video

The Inner Life of a Drag Queen

A short documentary about cross-dressing, masculinity, identity, and performance

Video

Let's Talk About Not Smoking

Why does smoking maintain its allure? James Hamblin seeks the wisdom of a cool person.

Writers

Up
Down

More in Video

Just In