The Short-Lived Brilliance of Batter Blaster

Sean O'Connor briefly revolutionized breakfast for thousands of people short on time and cooking skills.

Making waffles for his wife one day (and destroying his kitchen in the process), Sean O'Connor dreamt up the perfect shortcut: a can that would squirt out pancakes or waffles with the ease of a whipped cream dispenser. The result, Batter Blaster, briefly revolutionized breakfast for thousands of people short on time and cooking skills.

In this episode of the PBS web series Inventors, he describes the rise and fall of his brainchild. O'Connor is proud of the product -- its organic ingredients and its positive impact. "We've had quite a few emails from dads," he says, "divorced dads or single dads, that are like, 'Hey Batter Blaster, I can make heart-shaped pancakes for my girls on the weekends and I'm a hero.'" Sadly for those dads, Batter Blaster went out of business in August of 2012, leaving Facebook fans wondering where they'll get their fix. 

The Inventors series is created by David Friedman, a photographer who combines video and still photography to document his subjects. Check out more of his work on his site

For more from the PBS Inventors series, visit the YouTube channel

Kasia Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg is the executive producer for video at The AtlanticMore

Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg joined The Atlantic in 2011 to launch its video channel and, in 2013, create its in-house video production department. She leads the development and production of original documentaries, interviews, and other video content for The Atlantic. Previously, she worked as a producer at Al Gore’s Current TV and as a content strategist and documentary producer in San Francisco. She studied filmmaking and digital media at Harvard University.

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