How Children Use iPads

Are touch-screen devices harming kids' brains or making them smarter? Hanna Rosin shares her findings, with the help of her four-year-old son.

A few years into the touch-screen era, the sight of a child as young as two bent over an iPad can still be astonishing. "Norman Rockwell never painted Boy Swiping Finger on Screen," observes Hanna Rosin in the April Atlantic, "and our own vision of a perfect childhood has never adjusted to accommodate that now-common tableau." As Rosin reports, even children's app developers worry that the new technology "can be too addictive, too stimulating for the brain."

Here, with some help from her own four-year-old son, Gideon, Rosin explores this new technology and its not-so-dire effects on young children.


Jennie Rothenberg Gritz is The Atlantic's digital features editor. More

Jennie Rothenberg Gritz, an Atlantic senior editor, began her association with the magazine in 2002, shortly after graduating from the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism. She joined the staff full time in January 2006. Before coming to The Atlantic, Jennie was senior editor at Moment, a national magazine founded by Elie Wiesel.

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