How Children Use iPads

Are touch-screen devices harming kids' brains or making them smarter? Hanna Rosin shares her findings, with the help of her four-year-old son.

A few years into the touch-screen era, the sight of a child as young as two bent over an iPad can still be astonishing. "Norman Rockwell never painted Boy Swiping Finger on Screen," observes Hanna Rosin in the April Atlantic, "and our own vision of a perfect childhood has never adjusted to accommodate that now-common tableau." As Rosin reports, even children's app developers worry that the new technology "can be too addictive, too stimulating for the brain."

Here, with some help from her own four-year-old son, Gideon, Rosin explores this new technology and its not-so-dire effects on young children.


Jennie Rothenberg Gritz is a senior editor at The Atlantic, where she edits digital features.

How to Cook Spaghetti Squash (and Why)

Cooking for yourself is one of the surest ways to eat well. Bestselling author Mark Bittman teaches James Hamblin the recipe that everyone is Googling.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

How to Cook Spaghetti Squash (and Why)

Cooking for yourself is one of the surest ways to eat well.

Video

Before Tinder, a Tree

Looking for your soulmate? Write a letter to the "Bridegroom's Oak" in Germany.

Video

The Health Benefits of Going Outside

People spend too much time indoors. One solution: ecotherapy.

Video

Where High Tech Meets the 1950s

Why did Green Bank, West Virginia, ban wireless signals? For science.

Video

Yes, Quidditch Is Real

How J.K. Rowling's magical sport spread from Hogwarts to college campuses

Video

Would You Live in a Treehouse?

A treehouse can be an ideal office space, vacation rental, and way of reconnecting with your youth.

More in Video

Just In