The Science of Being Mean on Facebook

Henry Lieberman, a researcher at MIT's Media Lab, studies hate speech online with the goal of creating an algorithm that can fight back. "Bullies aren’t particularly creative," Emily Bazelon writes in her story on cyberbullying in the newest issue of The Atlantic. "Scrolling through ... insults, Lieberman and his students found that almost all of them fell under one (or more) of six categories: they were about appearance, intelligence, race, ethnicity, sexuality, or social acceptance and rejection." Insights into patterns of language like this provide the groundwork for a program that can recognize mean comments. In the segment below, the social and mobile video news network NowThis News visits the Media Lab to interview Lieberman about his work.

For more videos from Now This News, visit http://nowthisnews.com/.

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