Why Taking Breaks Will Help You Get More Work Done

The latest thinking in the science of productivity, animated

The latest thinking in the science of productivity, animated

The most elite musicians in the world don't necessarily spend more time practicing their craft than their less-accomplished peers. Instead, they spend more time practicing smartly. "They focus their energy in packets," ASAPScience notes in the video above. "Instead of diluting their energy over the entire day, they have periods of intense work followed by breaks. Not relying on willpower, they rely on habit and discipline and scheduling."

"Discipline," sure, is easier talked about than accomplished, particularly when there is a whole Internet of cats who will be sad if you do not watch their videos. And in a mobile-aided work culture that finds the lines between "work" and "play" ever more blurred, it can be harder than ever to impose structure on productivity. But the musicians are a good reminder to anyone -- whether elite violinists or totally non-elite office workers -- that the best way to get work done just might be to make sure you're making time to play, too.

Via Gizmodo

Megan Garber is a staff writer at The Atlantic. She was formerly an assistant editor at the Nieman Journalism Lab, where she wrote about innovations in the media.

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