A Tumbleweed-Like Toy Detonates Mines in Afghanistan

Inspired by the wind-powered toys he made as a child in Kabul, Massoud Hassani designed a revolutionary way to rid the desert of old explosives. 

Inspired by the wind-powered toys he made as a child in Kabul, Massoud Hassani designed a revolutionary way to rid the desert of old explosives. This documentary, directed by Callum Cooper for GE's Focus Forward film competition, illustrates how the inexpensive devices roll across the desert, detonating mines as they go. The Atlantic Global channel has the full story of the "Mine Kafon" here. You might recognize Cooper's affinity for interesting perspective shots from his experimental video Full Circle, which is best described as a jump rope's eye view of the world. 

For more work by Callum Cooper, visit www.callumcooper.com/.

Kasia Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg is the executive producer for video at The AtlanticMore

Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg joined The Atlantic in 2011 to launch its video channel and, in 2013, create its in-house video production department. She leads the development and production of original documentaries, interviews, and other video content for The Atlantic. Previously, she worked as a producer at Al Gore’s Current TV and as a content strategist and documentary producer in San Francisco. She studied filmmaking and digital media at Harvard University.

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