Semi-Visible Memories Haunt a Surreal Music Video

Deceptively simple special effects reveal a hidden universe in Paul Trillo's video for The Peach Kings' 'Lonely.' Paige McClain Wood and Steven Trezevant Dies, a Los Angeles-based duo, squeezed themselves into futuristic suits to play the invisible characters in the rooftop scene. 'Lonely' is on their new EP, Handsome Moves, available here, and Trillo describes how he created the video in a brief interview below. You might recognize his pastel visual style from his documentary about cats on the French Riviera, Bela: L'Homme Chat, also on the Atlantic Video channel.

The Atlantic: What was the inspiration for this video?

Paul Trillo: Loneliness can be a difficult feeling to express, this was a challenge. I wanted to find a way of showing something that is absent. I also wanted to give the impression as if you were experiencing this video alone. I had a few ideas floating in my head so it was just a matter of combining them. The whole thing was a pretty experimental process to achieve the end result.

How did you create the look of the (semi) invisible characters?

The invisible figures are actually the band members, Paige and Steven, dressed in blue and green Lycra suits. They are chroma keyed like a traditional green screen effect. The light and shadow artifacts are intentionally left in to give it the haunting ghostlike impression.

What's next for you?

A further exploration of revealing what is absent. Something that will utilize a similar invisible figure effect but taking it to the next level. Colored powder will definitely be involved. Could be an experimental short or could transform into a music video. Whatever form it eventually takes, I hope to share it with you soon.

For more work by Paul Trillo, visit http://paultrillo.com/.

Kasia Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg is the executive producer for video at The AtlanticMore

Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg joined The Atlantic in 2011 to launch its video channel and, in 2013, create its in-house video production department. She leads the development and production of original documentaries, interviews, and other video content for The Atlantic. Previously, she worked as a producer at Al Gore’s Current TV and as a content strategist and documentary producer in San Francisco. She studied filmmaking and digital media at Harvard University.

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