Celebrating a Halloween Tradition: 10 Ways to Smash a Pumpkin (in Slow Motion)

Spoiler: the samurai sword is the best one. 

Last Halloween, we featured a video of smashing pumpkins (literally) in ultra slow motion, at 1,000 frames per second. This year, a video from Ross Ching and Thrash Lab takes this premise to another level, filming 10 different techniques for destroying pumpkins, including samurai swords, chainsaws, and more. Actually, there are nine -- method number four doesn't quite seem to do it, but the others more than make up for it. Some viewers will point how incredibly wasteful it is to ruin perfectly good fruit for the sake of a silly video and that's valid -- but at least now you can enjoy some Halloween tomfoolery vicariously and leave the other pumpkins out there alone. 

For more videos from Thrash Lab, visit http://thrashlab.com/.

Kasia Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg is the executive producer for video at The AtlanticMore

Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg joined The Atlantic in 2011 to launch its video channel and, in 2013, create its in-house video production department. She leads the development and production of original documentaries, interviews, and other video content for The Atlantic. Previously, she worked as a producer at Al Gore’s Current TV and as a content strategist and documentary producer in San Francisco. She studied filmmaking and digital media at Harvard University.

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