What If an Electromagnetic Storm Wiped Out Your Digital 'Memories'?

A sci-fi short set in Paris in the year 2020 imagines a world where we pay a price for our obsession with social media. 

Lost Memories, a sci-fi short set in Paris in the year 2020, imagines a world where we pay a price for our obsession with social media. A young man, played by Luka Kellou, neglects his girlfriend, Magali Heu, compulsively sharing digital images of a romantic moment together. Wordlessly, she snaps an analogue Polaroid photo of him, as if to teach him a lesson, and disappears. 

Francois Ferracci, the writer and director of the short, talks about the project in an interview with One Small Window, explaining, "I wanted the audience to think about digital information flow, and also about how our memories will remain if one day everything disappears. I think it’s a very important question we have to ask to ourselves." Check out the rest of the interview for a fascinating look at the footage before and after special effects were added. Just under three minutes long, the short feels like it could be the beginning of something longer, but Ferracci just says "we'll see." 

For more work by Francois Ferracci, visit http://www.francoisferracci.com/.

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Kasia Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg is the executive producer for video at The AtlanticMore

Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg joined The Atlantic in 2011 to launch its video channel and, in 2013, create its in-house video production department. She leads the development and production of original documentaries, interviews, and other video content for The Atlantic. Previously, she worked as a producer at Al Gore’s Current TV and as a content strategist and documentary producer in San Francisco. She studied filmmaking and digital media at Harvard University.

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