Think Today's Sports Announcers Are Too Much? Listen to the 1952 Olympics

More

"Here in the European northlands of Scandinavia, a small, tough people puts out the carpet for the athletes of the world," begins an archival clip from the TV series The Big Picture, produced by the U.S. Army in the 1950s-1960s. These highlights from the 1952 games, excerpted from the half-hour show, reveal how much the Olympics have changed in 60 years. 

The narrator focuses on celebrating the achievements of athletes from the Army and Navy, of course, like Sammy Lee, the first Asian American athlete to win a gold medal for the U.S. (Helsinki was his second gold, in fact). "He is a living testament before the peoples of the world to equality of opportunity in America," the narrator announces proudly. He also makes a few snarky asides, gently mocking other participating countries. The Soviet Union competed in the Olympics for the first time in Helsinki, leading to an instant rivalry in many events. In a particularly awkward incident, an American swimmer accidentally flipped into his neighbor's lane -- a "red-capped" Russian who tried, unsuccessfully, to disqualify the invader. Details like this make the clip a fascinating time capsule of another era in sports (and international relations). This episode is available in its entirety at the Internet Archive

For more films from the Internet Archive, visit http://archive.org/.

Jump to comments

Kasia Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg is the executive producer for video at The AtlanticMore

Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg joined The Atlantic in 2011 to launch its video channel and, in 2013, create its in-house video production department. She leads the development and production of original documentaries, interviews, and other video content for The Atlantic. Previously, she worked as a producer at Al Gore’s Current TV and as a content strategist and documentary producer in San Francisco. She studied filmmaking and digital media at Harvard University.
Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

What's the Number One Thing We Could Do to Improve City Life?

A group of journalists, professors, and non-profit leaders predict the future of livable, walkable cities


Elsewhere on the web

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Adventures in Legal Weed

Colorado is now well into its first year as the first state to legalize recreational marijuana. How's it going? James Hamblin visits Aspen.

Video

What Makes a Story Great?

The storytellers behind House of CardsandThis American Life reflect on the creative process.

Video

Tracing Sriracha's Origin to Thailand

Ever wonder how the wildly popular hot sauce got its name? It all started in Si Racha.

Video

Where Confiscated Wildlife Ends Up

A government facility outside of Denver houses more than a million products of the illegal wildlife trade, from tigers and bears to bald eagles.

Video

Is Wine Healthy?

James Hamblin prepares to impress his date with knowledge about the health benefits of wine.

Video

The World's Largest Balloon Festival

Nine days, more than 700 balloons, and a whole lot of hot air

Writers

Up
Down

More in Video

Just In