Mesmerizing Motion Studies of Soap Bubbles, Magnetic Fluid, and Ink

Fluid dynamics meet abstract video art in London-based creative studio Bose Collins' series, The Flow. 

While browsing The Creators Project's Gallery, we came across a series of motion studies by London-based creative design firm Bose Collins. The Flow series uses a variety of media to explore the ways in which organisms and substances combine, crawl, erupt, and implode—or, more simply, how we move. Directed and produced by David Vigh, with camera work by András Már and music by Takkra, this series is an audiovisual feast.
 

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If you’ve never blown bubbles through cupped hands using antibacterial soap, you didn’t have a childhood. Washing your hands isn’t fun, I’ll be the first to admit it, but rendering glistening globes from foamy lather is really fun. Bose Collins capitalizes on the soapy aesthetic in their first Flow film, featuring filmy forms that jiggle against a dark and, at times, space-like background.
 

Ferrofluids are hot right now. By suspending magnetic particles in liquid and applying a magnetic field to the solution, visual artists are able to manipulate their medium in a very controlled way. In fact, the direction and editing of the video is so tight that it reads like a sound visualization. For a video whose preview looks like a macro photo of a chrysanthemum,The Flow II packs a serious punch.
 

When I watch videos of ink floating in water, I can’t help but think about what’s going on inside me: the flow of breath, the honey-roasted, sesame-coated cashews digesting in my belly, brain synapses firing off messages left and right, etc. There’s something very strange and beautiful about all the parallel processes happening in our bodies, and when I watch the multicolored explosions, pulsations, and undulations of ink in The Flow III, I’m reminded of them—though I seriously doubt anything brewing inside my body is half as pretty.

Written by Bonnie Wertheim for The Creators Project. See more of Bose Collins’s work on The Gallery.

This post also appears on The Creators Project, an Atlantic partner site. 

The Creators Project, a partnership between Intel and VICE, supports artists across a range of disciplines who are using technology in innovative ways to push the boundaries of creative expression. More


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