A LEGO Turing Machine Calculates 2+2

Jeroen van den Bos and Davy Landman honor the computer scientist Alan Turing by recreating his calculating machine with LEGOs.  

Alan Turing, considered the founding father of computer science, conceived of the Turing machine to illustrate mechanical computation in 1936. Although deceptively simple, the device can model more complex computer algorithms. Jeroen van den Bos and Davy Landman at Amsterdam's Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica set out to honor Turing's legacy by recreating his calculating machine with LEGOs. This short video from Andre Theelen demonstrates how the colorful plastic pieces can tackle a problem like adding two plus two. For more information on how they created the device, visit legoturingmachine.org.

For more videos by Andre Theelen, visit http://www.ecalpemos.nl/.

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Kasia Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg is the executive producer for video at The AtlanticMore

Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg joined The Atlantic in 2011 to launch its video channel and, in 2013, create its in-house video production department. She leads the development and production of original documentaries, interviews, and other video content for The Atlantic. Previously, she worked as a producer at Al Gore’s Current TV and as a content strategist and documentary producer in San Francisco. She studied filmmaking and digital media at Harvard University.

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