A Gorgeous Animation Composed of Hundreds of Paper Scraps

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In The Wolf I Used to Be... a wild animal dreams of joining society, only to discover that he hates cubicle life. This animation was handcrafted by the team at Nearly Normal, a production studio in London, in collaboration with a "paper engineer," Cintia Bertaccini. The story is by Saulo Jamariqueli, a founder of the company. 


Stills from the video

While the company has done work for major corporate clients, The Wolf I Used to Be... was an independent project and a chance for the creative team to experiment. On their site, they describe the process:

From the beginning we wanted to do a collaborative project where everyone could participate and contribute with ideas and time along the way. Nearly Normal was producing, but we didn’t want to have a director on this project. At first it was a bit mad because everyone had different ideas about which direction it should go. However the most important and most used phrase on set was “Let’s Try.”

A behind-the-scenes video shows the amazing amount of work that went into creating the characters and the sets in the short animation: 

They've also shared the animatic -- the rough sketch that works out the timing of the final piece: 

They have more details about the making of the video and photos on their site

For more work by Nearly Normal, visit http://nearlynormal.tv/.

Via the Curious Brain

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Kasia Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg is the executive producer for video at The AtlanticMore

Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg's work in media spans documentary television, advertising, and print. As a producer in the Viewer Created Content division of Al Gore's Current TV, she acquired and produced short documentaries by independent filmmakers around the world. Post-Current, she worked as a producer and strategist at Urgent Content, developing consumer-created and branded nonfiction campaigns for clients including Cisco, Ford, and GOOD Magazine. She studied filmmaking and digital media at Harvard University, where she was co-creator and editor in chief of H BOMB Magazine.

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