Vintage Anti-Drug Film Explains Addiction—With LEGOs

This totally bizarre film from the late '60s or '70s uses such a surreal parade of images to discourage drug use that it probably runs a risk of encouraging it instead. "Once you start some things, you just can't stop -- drugs are like that too," goes the song at the beginning of this excerpt, narrated by the singer and anti-gay activist Anita Bryant. She goes on to compare drugs to skipping, biting one's nails, stealing from the cookie jar, and rope swings. The film is available in its entirety at the Internet Archive, and there's a fun, four-minute remix by Tim Planagan on YouTube.

   
Stills from the film

For more films from the Internet Archive, visit http://www.archive.org/.

Via Laughing Squid. 

Kasia Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg is the executive producer for video at The AtlanticMore

Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg joined The Atlantic in 2011 to launch its video channel and, in 2013, create its in-house video production department. She leads the development and production of original documentaries, interviews, and other video content for The Atlantic. Previously, she worked as a producer at Al Gore’s Current TV and as a content strategist and documentary producer in San Francisco. She studied filmmaking and digital media at Harvard University.

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