How Hand-Tailored Style Keeps One Brooklyn Factory in Business

In the midst of the collapse of garment manufacturing in America, this short documentary directed by Matthew Edginton and produced by Style Ledger's Brett Fahlgren looks at how one family-owned business is hanging on. Martin Greenfield, the owner of the business, began working at the factory as a floor boy in 1947, after surviving the Holocaust. He quickly rose in the ranks and eventually took over the business. His philosophy is simple, he says; "I really believe with my whole heart that I don't have to advertise anything -- just make beautiful clothing." The video is the second in a series by Style Ledger about design and fashion made in America. 

For more on jobs and the economy, see the State of the Union 2012 issue of The Atlantic, including the cover story, Adam Davidson's "Making It in America," as well as Alan Taylor's photo series, "America at Work."

For more work by Matthew Edginton, visit http://matthewedginton.com/. For more by Brett Fahlgren, see http://styleledger.com/.

Via Vimeo Staff Picks.

Kasia Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg is the executive producer for video at The AtlanticMore

Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg joined The Atlantic in 2011 to launch its video channel and, in 2013, create its in-house video production department. She leads the development and production of original documentaries, interviews, and other video content for The Atlantic. Previously, she worked as a producer at Al Gore’s Current TV and as a content strategist and documentary producer in San Francisco. She studied filmmaking and digital media at Harvard University.

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