A Short Animation About How the NFL Is Like Socialism

Fraser Davidson, a London-based animator, created this unofficial video for Bill Maher's "Irritable Bowl Syndrome."

Fraser Davidson, a London-based animator, created this video inspired by Bill Maher's comparison of the economics of pro football and baseball. He brings a two-minute excerpt from the audio version of Maher's book, The New New Rules, to life with a blend of 1950s-style sports imagery and Soviet-era graphics. Although the video promotes the book, the project was neither authorized nor funded by the book's publisher. 

In an interview with Brandon Lori at Motionographer, Davidson describes his inspiration for the project:  

Well, it started out as a five-minute rant on Real Time with Bill Maher, the original clip of which is still on YouTube. I later found it in the audiobook version of Maher’s collection of such monologues. I edited it into a tight two-minute piece and started animating from there. It’s only intended as an homage to Bill’s original. The subject matter conjured up some aesthetic ideas taken from Soviet constructivism and 1950′s Americana which I thought might suit the piece.

For an interesting counterargument, see Allen Barra's "Baseball vs. Football: Which Sport Is More Fair?" :

I'm not writing to defend capitalism. But in truth, it's baseball, not football, that "takes money from the rich teams and gives it to the poorer ones." MLB does not have a salary cap like the NFL, but it does have a luxury tax, and teams that spend above a pre-set limit are required to pay a penalty that is divided among the other teams.

Read the rest here

For more work by Fraser Davidson, visit http://www.fraserdavidson.co.uk/.

Kasia Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg is the executive producer for video at The AtlanticMore

Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg joined The Atlantic in 2011 to launch its video channel and, in 2013, create its in-house video production department. She leads the development and production of original documentaries, interviews, and other video content for The Atlantic. Previously, she worked as a producer at Al Gore’s Current TV and as a content strategist and documentary producer in San Francisco. She studied filmmaking and digital media at Harvard University.

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