Miranda July's Handy Tip for the Easily Distracted

A deleted scene from Miranda July's film, The Future, demonstrates how to fight the forces of distraction, from gadgets to magazines

Miranda July has a quirky strategy for fighting the agents of distraction, from cell phones to gossip magazines: trap them and hold them hostage. This sequence didn't quite make it into her feature film The Future, but editors Andrew Bird and Rob G. Wilson have crafted it into a charming three-minute how-to video. 

July explains the back story for the scene in an interview with NOWNESS, an arts and culture blog:

This scene was meant to make it clear that Sophie was struggling against distraction, after losing time on YouTube—we all know how alluring these distractions are, and here we are seeing her attempting to take charge. I had her rig up a grape juice booby trap. In the next scene, which is actually in the movie, you see her run past the table and her white dress is covered in grape juice, which seemed like a funny visual way of showing that she had sacrificed the dress for the internet. Except that nobody got the whole grape juice trap. I don't think a single person understood why she was doing any of it. It just seemed like a bizarre performance in the middle of the movie. So I cut it. It's nice to show it here, and hopefully with the cards it isn't too mystifying.
For more work by Miranda July, visit http://mirandajuly.com/.

Kasia Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg is the executive producer for video at The AtlanticMore

Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg joined The Atlantic in 2011 to launch its video channel and, in 2013, create its in-house video production department. She leads the development and production of original documentaries, interviews, and other video content for The Atlantic. Previously, she worked as a producer at Al Gore’s Current TV and as a content strategist and documentary producer in San Francisco. She studied filmmaking and digital media at Harvard University.

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