Life in Black and White: Penguins

"It's so exciting to be able to be a part of their society." Life in Black and White is a series of four beautifully shot documentaries featuring people who work in "black and white." Marine biologist Pam Schaller spends her days working with the penguins at the California Academy of Sciences. Other films in the series feature dominos, grand pianos, and crossword puzzles; you can watch them here.

San Francisco-based filmmaker Regina Rivard talks about the making of the series in an interview with The Atlantic:

As far as the black and white theme, it almost came as an accident. I really wanted to interview a zebra zookeeper and I tried to think of a clever reason as to why the zoo should let me do this. That's when I had the idea and I immediately started brainstorming other interesting black and white jobs. I never did get the zebra interview, but I keep telling myself that it wouldn't have been nearly as good as the penguin interview that I did get.

Read the rest here.

Life in Black and White: Part III is produced, directed and edited by Regina Rivard, and shot by Josh Hittleman and Rob Fitzgerald. Audio is by Ben Morse and music is by Andy Greenwood

Kasia Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg is the executive producer for video at The AtlanticMore

Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg joined The Atlantic in 2011 to launch its video channel and, in 2013, create its in-house video production department. She leads the development and production of original documentaries, interviews, and other video content for The Atlantic. Previously, she worked as a producer at Al Gore’s Current TV and as a content strategist and documentary producer in San Francisco. She studied filmmaking and digital media at Harvard University.

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