Summer Heat in Extreme Slow Motion in '8 Hours in Brooklyn'

The team at Next Level Pictures took a Phantom Flex camera out for a Sunday afternoon in Brooklyn, and proved that summer in the city looks even hotter at 1,000+ frames per second. Most extreme slow motion footage is limited to a controlled studio environment, but this video turns that convention on its head with its handheld, documentary approach. 

The team at Next Level Pictures took a Phantom Flex camera out for a Sunday afternoon in Brooklyn, and proved that summer in the city looks even hotter at 1,000+ frames per second. Most extreme slow motion footage is limited to a controlled studio environment, but this video turns that convention on its head with its handheld, documentary approach. Director and cinematographer Jonathan Bregel described the process on their blog

"The idea behind this video was to document whatever sort of culture we could find within an 8 hour span with literally no pre-production. I have honestly seen too many slow-motion explosions, face slaps, and popping water baloons, that I thought capturing real culture, and real emotion would be a cool change of pace. My goal was to successfully pull of a few of these shots with a small crew in order to be able to pitch the Phantom Flex for a lot of the documentary work we shoot/produce. A big misconception is that you need a massive crew and massive lights in order to use this camera ... false. However, you do need to know how to use natural daylight to your advantage along with having a kick-ass core crew to support you."

For more videos from Next Level Pictures, see http://www.nextlevelpictures.com/

Kasia Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg is the executive producer for video at The AtlanticMore

Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg joined The Atlantic in 2011 to launch its video channel and, in 2013, create its in-house video production department. She leads the development and production of original documentaries, interviews, and other video content for The Atlantic. Previously, she worked as a producer at Al Gore’s Current TV and as a content strategist and documentary producer in San Francisco. She studied filmmaking and digital media at Harvard University.

The Case for Napping at Work

Most Americans don't get enough sleep. More and more employers are trying to help address that.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

The Case for Napping at Work

Most Americans don't get enough sleep. More and more employers are trying to help address that.

Video

A Four-Dimensional Tour of Boston

In this groundbreaking video, time moves at multiple speeds within a single frame.

Video

Who Made Pop Music So Repetitive? You Did.

If pop music is too homogenous, that's because listeners want it that way.

Video

Playing An Actual Keyboard Cat

A music video transforms food, pets, and objects into extraordinary instruments.

Video

Stunning GoPro Footage of a Wildfire

In the field with America’s elite Native American firefighting crew

Video

The Man Who Built a Forest Larger Than Central Park

Since 1979, he has planted more than 1,300 acres of trees.

More in Video

Just In