Nicole Krauss in Conversation

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Nicole Krauss on Fame, Loss, and Writing About Holocaust Survivors by Jennie Rothenberg Gritz
The Atlantic, October 21, 2010

A few years ago, after her novel The History of Love became an international bestseller, Nicole Krauss reflected on her unexpected fame: "Something about the feeling of writing seemed to change for me once the book was published. I felt, a bit, as if I'd lost something hard to put my finger on, something personal and natural that I'd loved about writing."

Today, Krauss is more accustomed to sharing her inner world with the public. Her newest book, Great House, has been nominated for a National Book Award, and early reviews have been packed with praise. "It is a high-wire performance," wrote fellow author Rebecca Newberger Goldstein in a glowing New York Times book review earlier this week, "only the wire has been replaced by an exposed nerve, and you hold your breath, and she does not fall."
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Jennie Rothenberg Gritz is The Atlantic's digital features editor. More

Jennie Rothenberg Gritz, an Atlantic senior editor, began her association with the magazine in 2002, shortly after graduating from the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism. She joined the staff full time in January 2006. Before coming to The Atlantic, Jennie was senior editor at Moment, a national magazine founded by Elie Wiesel.

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