Diana Eng's Electric Fashions

Also see:
The Little Black Piezoelectric Dress by Ada Brunstein
The Atlantic, June 2010

On a Wednesday night in February, one week after fashion's biggest names descended on New York for Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week, techy designer Diana Eng's models were strutting a different kind of stuff: the Twinkle Dress, for example. As a striking brunette model slinked by, her flirty frock, embroidered with LEDs, conductive silverized thread, and microphones, lit up in response to tunes from a quartet playing homemade digital instruments. Off the runway, the dress's microphones can pick up sounds from the wearer's voice: when she speaks, she lights up in true diva style.

Jennie Rothenberg Gritz is a senior editor at The Atlantic, where she edits digital features.

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