Alan Moore: From Hell

The Sorcery of Alan Moore by James Parker
The Atlantic, May 2009

"Moore retains a pagan suspicion of Hollywood, and has refused to so much as look at any of the adaptations of his work. The first two, it’s true, he would barely recognize: the Hughes brothers’ From Hell (2001) made a bloody hash of his multitiered Ripper-ography, while The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen (2003) rendered the literary supermen of the graphic novel--Captain Nemo, Quatermain, etc.--as a sort of antiquarian A-Team. V for Vendetta (2006) was getting closer, but missed the original’s very English seep of paranoia--a tone, incidentally, that was perfectly caught by the same year’s Children of Men. And now we have Zack Snyder’s Watchmen--as devout and frame-by-frame a reworking as could be imagined."

Jennie Rothenberg Gritz is a senior editor at The Atlantic, where she edits digital features.

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