The Price is Wright


Little Skyscraper on the Prairie by Wayne Curtis
The Atlantic, July/August 2008

"Wright, who is best known for his low Prairie-style buildings, had a complicated relationship with tall buildings, calling one an 'incongruous mantrap of monstrous dimensions.' Yet late in life he created drawings for a 528-story skyscraper featuring atomic-powered elevators with five cabs strung vertically in each shaft. (It was never built.) Price Tower is the tallest building Wright constructed, and it's every bit as startling rising out of the low Oklahoma hills as his corkscrewy Guggenheim Museum is crouched in the canyons of Manhattan."
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Jennie Rothenberg Gritz is a senior editor at The Atlantic, where she edits digital features.

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