Good Infrastructure News at Last

By Edward Tenner

800px-Riegelsville_Bridge_2.jpg

Whatever else may be falling apart, one of the America's most historic (if little-known) structures is still going strong after a major renewal, the Newark Star-Ledger reports. And the original cables are still doing their job after over a century of the automotive age and northwest New Jersey weather:

The bridge, which crosses to Pennsylvania near the Warren-Hunterdon county border, hearkens to the year when Teddy Roosevelt was president, Cary Grant was born and the Trans-Siberian railway was completed. Bridge historians herald it as one of the few, if not only, remaining American multi-span highway bridges with continuous cables.

Unlike the typical suspension bridge that contains two suspension towers, the Riegelsville Bridge has four. And you can't miss the signature Roebling bridge cables -- still holding the bridge together more than a century later -- or the ornate touches.

Congratulations to the Roebling descendants, to the enlightened Delaware River Toll Bridge Commission, to the construction team, and to the Star-Ledger for prominent coverage in print and great additional photography by Tony Kurdzuk online. It's a wonderful feeling to see such a classic renewed.

Image: Riegelsville suspension bridge seen from Pennsylvania side, Wikimedia Commons.

This article available online at:

http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2011/01/good-infrastructure-news-at-last/69059/