Why Treaties Can't Stop Cyber Sabotage

By Niraj Chokshi

Cyberattacks have become a growing concern this year, but international agreements aimed at curbing such threats are more bark than bite, Miller McCune's Michael Scott Moore argues.

Recommendations in Europe -- from The Economist, the U.N. and Russia -- involve nuclear-style arms treaties to manage the cyber-arms race now under way. These agreements would set rules for international response to cyber-attacks and authorize sanctions against nations that engage in them. But a treaty would be easy to cheat on and tough to enforce; a hacker who can set a logic bomb can also cover his tracks.

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This article available online at:

http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2010/08/why-treaties-cant-stop-cyber-sabotage/62160/