What a $120,000 TV Looks Like

No, the thing is not covered in diamonds. But it does have a curved screen.
Samsung

Inches: 105. Pixels: 11 million. Aspect ratio: 29 to 1. U.S. dollars: $119,999.

Meet the Samsung 05U9500, a television that costs roughly the same as a BMW. Or a two-bedroom house (in many places). Or a college education (in some places). 

The mega-gadget, at this point, is available by special order only. And the thing, apparently, charges by the acronym, of which it offers many. The mega-TV features not just OLED, but also LCD. And UHD. (And also: OMG! And also: USA! And also: LOL.) 

The main thing being sold here, however—besides A Certain Lifestyle, and undeniable evidence that You Have Made It—is the curved screen, the latest thing in high-tech display-ery. (Such a screen, Samsung promises, makes for more immersive viewing than the standard flat screen, thereby creating "the ultimate cinematic experience.")

But if a marginally more intimate experience with George Clooney is not enough to get you to hand over your Black Card, there are also the additional features that are increasingly becoming standard in high-end TVs.  That includes Internet connectivity via, in this case, Samsung's Smart Hub, which allows for streaming services like Netflix and Amazon to display on the LED/LCD/OMG screen. There is also the ability to display personal photos and videos. And the ability to divide the display into four sections, so you can browse Facebook while watching movies (IDK!). And there is also a specially designed wall mount, so that you may hang your screen on the wall like the art that it is. 

That mount, however, is sold separately.

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Megan Garber is a staff writer at The Atlantic.

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