Back to The Wire What is The Wire? The Wire features the latest news coverage from The Atlantic.

Here's How to Stop Facebook From Snooping in Your Web History

Today, the social-media giant announced it was adding targeted advertising based on browsing patterns.

This week, Facebook announced it was expanding its evil empire adding targeted advertising based on your browsing history. Thankfully, they also give you the option to avoid it.

While Facebook's new advertising setup allows you more control over how they use your data, it also allows Facebook to collect more of your data. While you can limit your digital habits and some settings, your data and history are still being cached and shared. To keep your browsing history safe from Facebook's advertisers, you have to actively opt-out.

Here's how to do that.

Note: In order to do this, please turn off AdBlock Plus or any other program you may be running that disables cookies. If you clear your cookies regularly, you will need to repeat the opt-out process, every time you do so.

1. Go to Digital Advertising Alliance.

2. Find Facebook on the long list of "Companies Customizing Ads For Your Browser"

Be patient. The tool can take some time to scan your browser.

3. Check off the box for Facebook (and any other sites you don't want following you) and press "Submit your choices"

4. Bask in the glory of not being (even more) monitored by Facebook

Or you can just welcome our new Facebook overlords and accept their constant presence in your life. I browse dolphin websites a lot, Zuckerberg. Enjoy.


This post previously appeared on The Wire.

Presented by

Polly Mosendz is a former associate editor at The Atlantic.

The Best 71-Second Animation You'll Watch Today

A rock monster tries to save a village from destruction.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

The Best 71-Second Animation You'll Watch Today

A rock monster tries to save a village from destruction.

Video

The Case for Napping at Work

Most Americans don't get enough sleep. More and more employers are trying to help address that.

Video

A Four-Dimensional Tour of Boston

In this groundbreaking video, time moves at multiple speeds within a single frame.

Video

Who Made Pop Music So Repetitive? You Did.

If pop music is too homogenous, that's because listeners want it that way.

Video

Stunning GoPro Footage of a Wildfire

In the field with America’s elite Native American firefighting crew

More in Technology

Just In