What Was Your First Tweet?

A new service would like to remind you of your first post to the platform. Prepare to be humbled. 

The world's first tweet was short and perfunctory and notable both for its lack of punctuation and its lack of capitalization. It was sent by Jack Dorsey, nearly eight years ago today:

As more and more people signed up for Twitter, more first tweets would emerge. Some would be, like Dorsey's, brief and un-punctuated and vaguely meta in their reference to Twitter. Others would sidestep the "Hey! Now I'm on Twitter!" stuff and plunge right into the brave new world of 140-character life updates. 

I know this because of a new tool launched today, First Tweet, which lets you track Twitter users' first posting to the platform. The results are often delightful, often comical, and occasionally ... humbling. Many are professional in tone. Some embrace the freewheeling-life-update aspect of the platform. 

Take the first tweets of your correspondents here at The Atlantic Tech. Mine (I wrote for the Columbia Journalism Review when I signed up for the service) was purely professional, treating Twitter as a platform for broadcasting and crowdsourcing: 

Alexis's was similarly down-to-business: 

Rob, on the other hand, went full life-update: 

To be clear, none of us are particularly proud of these first forays into the world of microblogging. The only person, we agree, whose first tweet passes the test of time is our executive editor, John Gould—who managed to combine the personal and the professional and the meta into one glorious message. Bow before this, everyone:

Presented by

Megan Garber is a staff writer at The Atlantic.

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