What the 150,000 Attendees of CES Are Doing Right Now

Schmoozing, boozing, waiting for cabs: Here's an unscientific accounting of technology's biggest get-together.
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Reuters

This year has seen nearly record-setting attendance numbers for the International Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. According to the CEA, the organization that hosts the event, some 150,000 people have made the pilgrimage to the desert to participate in the conference, to report on its doings, and to otherwise play their parts in the technology industry's yearly pageant.

So what are those people actually up to? How have they been spending their time in Vegas? Below, inspired by Justin Peters' classic, is a general rundown.

50,740 are inside the Las Vegas Convention Center's North Hall.

34,356 are inside the Las Vegas Convention Center's South Hall.

24,912 are inside the Las Vegas Convention Center's Central Hall.

1,573 are in a hallway in The Venetian, trying on “wearables.”

875 are stuck on an unnumbered mezzanine in The Venetian, trying to find the hallway with all the wearables. 

84,723 are wondering what that smell is.

are dressed as kangaroos.

1 is dressed as Tablet Man.

114 are watching robots that fly. 

412 are watching robots that drive.

27 are watching robots that vacuum. 

84,435 are trying to connect to the wifi. 

52,932 are failing. 

Reuters

146,870 are wearing name tags. 

6,476 are wearing backpacks.

3,792 are wearing overcoats.

25 are wearing evening gowns. 

417 are wearing miniskirts. 

are playing SkeeBall at the United States Postal Service's booth.

2 are wondering why there's SkeeBall at the United States Postal Service's booth. 

2,854 are entering a raffle.

78,992 are getting free stuff. 

29,043 are providing their contact information in exchange for free stuff.

22 are getting chair massages. 

32 are trying Oculus Rift

2 are breakdancing. 

15,315 are talking about “innovation.”

27,943 are talking about "connection."

25,866 are talking about "the cloud." 

3,254 are on the phone with a PR team in San Mateo, strategizing.

1 is on the phone with a PR team in Hollywood, apologizing.

569 are looking at an array of delicate, 3D-printed figurines.

472 are confused.

2,476 are eating hummus.

1,389 are eating potato chips.

6,486 are eating stale croissants.

18,235 are coming down with the flu.

12 are practicing yoga.

123,045 are looking at screens.

8,476 are looking at screens that curve.

310 are looking at screens that are built into eyeglasses. 

19,073 are looking at screens that are nearly the size of walls.

363 are starting to wonder if they might be epileptic.

29,365 are making a deal with a distributor.

5,341 are making a deal with a manufacturer. 

27,651 are hearing Sara Bareilles' "Brave" on loudspeakers. Again.

101,203 are hearing undifferentiated techno on loudspeakers. Again. 

57,438 are waiting in a cab line.

39,342 are waiting in a bus line.

3,499 are waiting in a Monorail line.

11,626 are waiting in a bathroom line.

28,401 are waiting in a Starbucks line.

7,321 are wishing they'd brought more comfortable shoes.

5,386 are Instagramming a buffet.

9,254 are tweeting about a buffet.

4,357 are wondering which hashtag will best capture their buffet experience.

4,112 are wondering whether #whathappensinvegas is still a thing.

2,246 are deciding that a #yolo joke is better.

46 are catching the Britney Spears show at Planet Hollywood.

45 are doing so ironically.

22 are catching the Boyz II Men show at The Mirage. 

0 are doing so ironically. 

The Mirage

64 are at Craftsteak, expensing the tasting menu.

45 are having a similar prix-fixe at Nobu. 

56 are having a similar one at Robuchon.

12 are having a similar one at Jean Georges. 

128 are settling for brats at an outdoor conference cafe named "Sausagefest."

150,000 are victims of surge pricing.

148,924 are aware of this.

19,456 are wondering where they put the receipts.

8,357 are sitting on hallucinogenically patterned carpeting, availing themselves of power outlets that are usually reserved for vacuum cleaners.

6,275 are searching for power outlets.

1,284 have seriously like only 2 percent of their battery power left.

1,117 are filming TV spots.

547 are recording radio spots.

18,246 are writing blog posts.

3,754 are writing blog posts that describe something as “game-changing.”

852 are unsure of the historic validity of their own reviews.

127 are looking for Robert Scoble.

1 is gleefully taunting them.

139,437 are selling something. 

22,385 are thinking about that model they talked to earlier at the Sigma booth.

18,466 are deciding they totally have a shot with her.

17,597 are playing blackjack.

4,687 are playing slots. 

115 are playing Pai Gow.

20,937 are going to lose in the end. 

29,117 are drunk.

40,570 are getting there.

34,965 are hungover.

125,267 are tired.

148,678 are thirsty.

141,559 are probably ready to leave.

1 definitely is. 

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Megan Garber is a staff writer at The Atlantic. She was formerly an assistant editor at the Nieman Journalism Lab, where she wrote about innovations in the media.

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