Google Scholar Is Doing Just Fine, Says Google

Hope for Google's nerdy little brother
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Under Larry Page, Google has had the stated strategic goal of putting "more wood behind fewer arrows." The company may dabble in robotics, but the company has steadily reduce the number of products it supports for public web users. 

Simultaneous with these efforts, I noticed the demotion of Scholar among the company's offerings. Product updates were few and far between. Given that Google can hire lots of people to do just about anything, the steady-state of Scholar gave me the idea that perhaps Google was going to sunset the service. Google has been mum on the topic.

But perhaps not. Tucked away in a Science Magazine news story, we find a ray of hope for Google Scholar. Anurag Acharya, the Googler who created Scholar, told reporter John Bohannon that the service is in fine shape. 

"Although Google Scholar generates no direct income, Acharya is upbeat about its future," Bohannon writes. "While he declines to reveal usage figures, he claims that the number of users is growing worldwide, particularly in China. And the Google Scholar team is expanding, not contracting. 'Rumors of our demise are greatly exaggerated.'" 

If true, this is great news! Scholar (and Microsoft's Academic Search) are a mindbogglingly useful intermediate step between scholarship and public knowledge. 

Anurag, all you had to do was tell us that everything was OK. We fret because we love. It's not as if the rumors could not have been quelled a long time ago by simply telling people who depend on the service what was happening. Or by releasing new features.

 

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Alexis C. Madrigal

Alexis Madrigal is a senior editor at The Atlantic, where he oversees the Technology Channel. He's the author of Powering the Dream: The History and Promise of Green Technology. More

The New York Observer calls Madrigal "for all intents and purposes, the perfect modern reporter." He co-founded Longshot magazine, a high-speed media experiment that garnered attention from The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and the BBC. While at Wired.com, he built Wired Science into one of the most popular blogs in the world. The site was nominated for best magazine blog by the MPA and best science Web site in the 2009 Webby Awards. He also co-founded Haiti ReWired, a groundbreaking community dedicated to the discussion of technology, infrastructure, and the future of Haiti.

He's spoken at Stanford, CalTech, Berkeley, SXSW, E3, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and his writing was anthologized in Best Technology Writing 2010 (Yale University Press).

Madrigal is a visiting scholar at the University of California at Berkeley's Office for the History of Science and Technology. Born in Mexico City, he grew up in the exurbs north of Portland, Oregon, and now lives in Oakland.

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