A Rare Glimpse of the Moon Orbiting the Earth From Afar

In just a few flickering pixels, our entire planet and its only moon.
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At first you can't even see it. It's too dark, too small. And then, helpfully, an arrow appears: "Moon".

That's it. The biggest object in the night sky as it appears from Earth. The glowing orb that inspired humans from the first, and eventually drew them to its surface.

But from NASA's Juno spacecraft, it's just a few gray flickering pixels. And the Earth, ("on it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives," as Carl Sagan famously put it), is just a few pixels more, just a bit brighter. Everything else is blackness.

It's a video of our moon circling our planet shot from a spacecraft heading to Jupiter, and it is humbling. 

 

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Rebecca J. Rosen is a senior editor at The Atlantic, where she oversees the Business Channel. She was previously an associate editor at The Wilson Quarterly.

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