A Printable Humanoid Robot and Why Mourning Is Futurism

Plus: civilian drones, the infrastructure of web publishing, and Silicon Valley's Batman-themed go-go club in today's 5 Intriguing Things.
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Make my day (InMoov).

1. Meet InMoov, an open-source 3D printed life-size humanoid robot project. Some assembly required.

"This is going to be interesting. We are going to assemble a finger to a small servo for testing it with an Arduino board."

 

2. When someone dies, we mourn the futures we imagined we'd have with them

"In the years ahead, it may be able possible to measure the 'trauma' of a spousal death, a breakup, a forced career change, or other stressful event on the basis of how established that relationship was in a person’s perceived future."

 

3. The economics and infrastructure that you don't see on the web structures what you do: on the confusing, mostly hidden side of publishing on the Internet

"Looking at Medium, along with Vox, and Glam, and even AOL, I think I can begin to discern the vague outlines of how digital publishing might eventually be able to deliver the kind of scale and impact that brand advertisers demand from TV and glossy magazines."

 

Batman club (Voices of East Anglia)

4. There was once a night club in Silicon Valley that changed its name from Sunnyvale-a-Go-Go to Wayne Manor, which had a Batman theme.

"Admittedly this seems somewhat unlikely these days but back in 1966 if you happened to reside in the Bay Area of San Francisco you were in for a treat as Wayne Manor opened with dancers dressed as Catwoman and Bat Girl and the whole place done out like the Bat Cave."

 

5. Chris Anderson's drone company, 3D Robotics, launches its civilian craft off the USS Hornet

 

Thanks Robin Sloan, Yasmine Abbas, and Patrick Tucker. As always, you can send suggestions to: amadrigal[at]theatlantic.com. 

 

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Alexis C. Madrigal

Alexis Madrigal is the deputy editor of TheAtlantic.com, where he also oversees the Technology Channel. He's the author of Powering the Dream: The History and Promise of Green Technology. More

The New York Observer has called Madrigal "for all intents and purposes, the perfect modern reporter." He co-founded Longshot magazine, a high-speed media experiment that garnered attention from The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and the BBC. While at Wired.com, he built Wired Science into one of the most popular blogs in the world. The site was nominated for best magazine blog by the MPA and best science Web site in the 2009 Webby Awards. He also co-founded Haiti ReWired, a groundbreaking community dedicated to the discussion of technology, infrastructure, and the future of Haiti.

He's spoken at Stanford, CalTech, Berkeley, SXSW, E3, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and his writing was anthologized in Best Technology Writing 2010 (Yale University Press).

Madrigal is a visiting scholar at the University of California at Berkeley's Office for the History of Science and Technology. Born in Mexico City, he grew up in the exurbs north of Portland, Oregon, and now lives in Oakland.

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