What It's Like to Plummet to Earth at 834 Miles Per Hour

 New footage shows Felix Baumgartner's record-breaking freefall from the stuntman's point of view.

What's it like to plummet to Earth when your starting point is 24 miles above Earth's surface? What's it like to free-fall at 833.9 mph — 140 mph faster than the speed of sound?

When the Austrian daredevil Felix Baumgartner made his great leap from space last year, it was not only the record-breaking nature of the jump that inspired the Earth-bound. It was also, and more so, the video of the leap—the (camera) shot heard 'round the world. The YouTube version of the dive went immediately viral. (It currently has more than 35 million views.) The footage gave people a taste—a spinning, heavy-breathed, terrifying-even-through-a-computer-screen taste—of what it was like to be in Baumgartner's shoes. Or at least in Baumgartner's chute.

Now, to mark the record-breaking dive's one-year anniversary, Red Bull (Baumgartner's sponsor for the dive) has released another video of Baumgartner's freefall—this one explicitly shot from Baumgartner's point of view. It's the same spinning and breathing and terror-mongering you might recognize from the originally published video, except even more intimate. And even more exhilarating.

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Megan Garber is a staff writer at The Atlantic.

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