'Please Contact Us': It's Been a Tough Week for the Nobel Prize Twitter Feed

Tales of temporary rejection from an organization not used to being ignored

This morning brought the announcement of the 2013 winner of the Nobel Peace Prize: the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons. 

Here is the announcement of that news—at least as it played out on Twitter:

And then:

And then:

After that, @Nobelprize_org began speaking (well, "speaking") directly to OPCW via the organization's (unverified, but seemingly legitimate) Twitter feed:

To which @OPCW, it seems, did not reply. 

So @Nobelprize_org escalated the situation, in the subtle way that one can escalate a situation on Twitter. @OPCW, obviously aware of its win, tweeted this:

Which @Nobelprize_org proceeded to retweet

But—come on, @OPCW!—this little hey-we-know-you-know-about-the-Prize gesture was apparently unrequited. Because soon after its retweet, @Nobelprize_org posted this:

And then, after the press conference had concluded with no contact from the OPCW, this:

If any of the OPCW exchange sounds familiar, it's because the Nobel Committee seems to have had a rough couple of days when it comes to talking with its laureates. And Twitter has given the organization a convenient platform through which to share—and, really, to vent—its frustrations. 

Here was the Nobel account, earlier this week, announcing its missed connection with Physics laureate Peter Higgs:

And, yesterday, the feed treated its more than 50,000 followers to the tale of its temporarily unrequited phone call with Literature laureate Alice Munro:

The feed then, dejectedly, followed up that announcement with this: 

All's well that ends well, of course, and the OPCW saga will likely end in the same way Munro's did: With the @Nobel_org Twitter feed expressing its relief that it's finally gotten in touch with the object of its overtures. 

Until then, though, the feed waits. And hopes. And sends delightfully passive-aggressive messages in the name of world peace. 

 

Update: Connection made! All is well.

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Megan Garber is a staff writer at The Atlantic.

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