Every Tech Commercial Ever Made, in 1 Minute

Guest-starring white people, children, baguettes, and glockenspiels
More

Have we reached peak tech commercial?

Yeah, probably not. But we have reached a saturation point with our abundant ads for smartphones and wearable tech and web services -- to the extent that it's easy to identify the platonic characteristics of those ads. Tech ads, almost invariably, feature some combination of:

• white people
• accordion music
• wordless logos
• fast editing
• people doing quirky jobs
• bakers stirring dough
• international people in international settings
• adorable children being adorable
• indie rock
• people connecting/interconnecting/interacting
• people connecting/interconnecting/interacting, as demonstrated through in-unison laughter
• architects
• drafting tables
• retro glasses
• glockenspiel music
• gardening
• baguettes
• more white people

And, indeed: A lit review conducted by my colleague at The Atlantic Wire, Rebecca Greenfield, confirms that the ads do indeed "have some undeniable style parities." Which also means that tech ads are ripe for satire. Which has been provided, in the video above, by the good people at College Humor. Which will probably make you laugh, and definitely make you wish that you were a wicker-weaver.

Enjoy, and happy Friday.

Via All Things D

Jump to comments
Presented by

Megan Garber is a staff writer at The Atlantic. She was formerly an assistant editor at the Nieman Journalism Lab, where she wrote about innovations in the media.

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

'Stop Telling Women to Smile'

An artist's campaign to end sexual harassment on the streets of NYC.


Elsewhere on the web

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Where Time Comes From

The clocks that coordinate your cellphone, GPS, and more

Video

Computer Vision Syndrome and You

Save your eyes. Take breaks.

Video

What Happens in 60 Seconds

Quantifying human activity around the world

Writers

Up
Down

More in Technology

Just In