Interactive Gettysburg: Using Modern Mapping Tools for a New Look at the Historical Battle

Seeing how Gettysburg played out on a map can help us understand why, in the end, it turned out as it did.
Screen Shot 2013-07-01 at 1.25.12 PM.jpg

What Lee would have been able to see, based on the terrain, on July 3, 1863, when he decided to launch his doomed assault, Pickett's Charge. According to a new project, "Half or more of the Federal forces [blue] were completely hidden from view." (Anne Kelly Knowles/Smithsonian)

When Robert E. Lee looked out over the land at Gettysburg, 150 years ago this week, what could he see?

Not much, says Middlebury professor of geography Anne Kelly Knowles. That is her conclusion based on a nearly decade-long project to visualize the Battle of Gettysburg using advanced digital mapping techniques, available for your exploration at Smithsonian.com.

"What our visual terrain analysis shows is that Lee, at no point in the battle, could see how many federal forces kept arriving at the field," she told me. "He really had no idea how big the force was that he was attacking on day two and day three."

The idea of using GIS to map the historical battle first came to Knowles one morning 12 years ago. "I was literally brushing my teeth one morning and I thought, gosh, what could Lee see at Gettysburg?" she said.

Because surveillance technology at the time of the Civil War lacked aerial capabilities, intelligence about troop movements was limited to what generals and their scouts could actually see. Based on that visual information, generals had to make quick decisions about whether to attack and where to deploy troops. "I knew that GIS could help a person answer that question, because you can use it to analyze terrain three dimensionally," she explained.

Screen-Shot-2013-07-01-at-2.28.29-PM.jpg

The lay of the land on the first day of the battle, 150 years ago today. (Knowles/Smithsonian)

Her project got a boost when she came across a map stored in the National Archives' Treasure Vault created in the late 1860s and early 1870s by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Knowles describes the map with enthusiasm. "It is enormous," she says It measures 12 by 13 feet, with each foot on the map measuring 1,200 feet on the ground, with a contour interval indicating every four feet of elevation change. It shows the buildings, the topography, the land cover, where the hardwood trees were, where the pines were, where the orchards were, whether fences were made of wood or stone. "The famous peach orchard that figures so importantly in the battle on the second day is labeled on the map and is shown by little tiny peach trees."

According to Knowles, "This was better than any modern data and it was historically accurate."

Warren_1874_map-2.jpg

"It is one of the most beautiful maps ever made. It is a stunning visual memorial to the battle," says Knowles. (Used by permission of the National Archives and Records Administration)

Information about the whereabouts and movements of the troops came from another source, the reporting of John B. Bachelder "a sort of mediocre landscape artist and cartographer from New Hampshire," as Knowles describes him. Bachelder, she says, "saw an opportunity in this incredibly important battle, rushed to the battlefield almost immediately after the battle, and started interviewing veterans of the battle -- foot soldiers, generals." He eventually secured $10,000 from Congress to complete his work and published 23 maps documenting the battle's play-by-play, sometimes showing the changing troop configurations at an increment of only half an hour. Knowles and research assistant Dan Miller digitized Bachelder's work onto their map, checking against other sources, she says, because Bachelder's data isn't perfectly accurate. Alex Tait of International Mapping Associates and Allen Carroll of ESRI's StoryMap project produced the historical basemap and brought everything together in the website.

Presented by

Rebecca J. Rosen is a senior editor at The Atlantic, where she oversees the Business Channel. She was previously an associate editor at The Wilson Quarterly.

The Man Who Owns 40,000 Video Games

A short documentary about an Austrian gamer with an uncommon obsession

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

The 86-Year-Old Farmer Who Won't Quit

A filmmaker returns to his hometown to profile the patriarch of a family farm

Video

Riding Unicycles in a Cave

"If you fall down and break your leg, there's no way out."

Video

Carrot: A Pitch-Perfect Satire of Tech

"It's not just a vegetable. It's what a vegetable should be."

Video

An Ingenious 360-Degree Time-Lapse

Watch the world become a cartoonishly small playground

Video

The Benefits of Living Alone on a Mountain

"You really have to love solitary time by yourself."

More in Technology

Just In