This Is What It Feels Like to Finally Reach Space

Smiles on the faces of all the astronauts last night as they boarded the International Space Station

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The smiles on their faces say it all. Last night, a little after midnight on the East coast, three astronauts floated off a Russian Soyuz space capsule and onto the International Space Station where they will live for the next six months. The astronauts (from left to right: Fyodor Yurchikhin of Russia, Karen L. Nyberg of the USA, and Luca Parmitano of Italy) had departed just eight hours earlier from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. It is Parmitano's first time living in space; for Nyberg and Yorchikhin, yesterday's arrival was a return visit. If you'd like to follow their adventures at 260+ miles up, Nyberg and Parmitano will be tweeting at @AstroKarenN and @astro_luca.

[Editor's note: Really disappointed in the lack of mustache.]

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Rebecca J. Rosen is a senior editor at The Atlantic, where she oversees the Business Channel. She was previously an associate editor at The Wilson Quarterly.

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