Serenity Now: Clear Your Tabs, Clear Your Mind (With One Glorious Click)

The Chrome extension for the overly tabbed
shutterstock_66216118-570.jpgMe after I cleared all my tabs, basically (Yuri Arcurs/Shutterstock)

Is your computer running at a turtle's pace because you have just way too many tabs open? Can you not see the Gchat alert blinking because your tab has been compressed to the size of pinky toenail? Does it sometimes feel like your brain has too many tabs open?

A new Chrome extension will bring you some peace of mind. Install OneTab (takes mayyybe two seconds), and a little funnel icon will appear to the right of your URL bar. With one click to the funnel, OneTab will swoop up all your tabs and give you just (you guessed it) one tab containing a list of all the links you've been keeping open for just way too long. It does so with a nice, relief-bringing animation too.

Screen Shot 2013-03-25 at 10.32.42 AM.jpg

Now all I need is a OneTab for my desktop -- my physical desktop.

Presented by

Rebecca J. Rosen is a senior editor at The Atlantic, where she oversees the Business Channel. She was previously an associate editor at The Wilson Quarterly.

Does This Child Need Marijuana?

Dravet Syndrome is a severe form of epilepsy that affects children. Could marijuana oils alleviate their seizures?

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Does This Child Need Marijuana?

Inside a family's fight to use marijuana oils to treat epilepsy

Video

A Miniature 1950s Utopia

A reclusive artist built this idealized suburb to grapple with his painful childhood memories.

Video

Why Principals Matter

Nadia Lopez didn't think anybody cared about her school. Then the Internet heard her story.

Video

A History of Contraception

In the 16th century, men used linen condoms laced shut with ribbons.

Video

'A Music That Has No End'

In Spain, a flamenco guitarist hustles to make a modest living.

More in Technology

Just In