Watch This Year's Only Total Solar Eclipse Stream Live Here

Beginning a bit after 2 p.m. EST today, the moon will pass between the sun and the Earth, but you'll need an online stream to see it unless you are in northern Australia.

TSE2012pp2a.JPG

NASA

Every year there are two to five solar eclipses -- enough to make them not exactly routine but not the rarest of birds. Total eclipses make up on average about one eclipse every two years. But just because they happen relatively often, doesn't mean they're easy to see: Eclipses appear total from just a very narrow slice of Earth's surface, so unless you are in the precise right place at the precise right time, you won't see it.

Today's total eclipse is no exception -- its path is almost entirely over ocean, indicated by the blue line in the image above. But what nature has taken away, the Internet will provide: Good, live views of this phenomenon, from the comfort of your living room (or office, as it will happen squarely during work hours in America) without any danger posed to your eyes.


Streaming begins at 2 p.m. EST and the eclipse will reach totality about an hour and a half later. Totality will only last for about two minutes, so be ready.


Update 2:58: Alas nothing can be done about the clouds. Hopefully they part in the next 30 minutes.

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Rebecca J. Rosen is a senior editor at The Atlantic, where she oversees the Business Channel. She was previously an associate editor at The Wilson Quarterly.

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