'In the Water, a Supercomputer and a Population of Dolphins'

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"The dolphins are there to program the computer acoustically with ultrasonic sound waves from their sophisticated sonar systems."


Yesterday, I mentioned that Navy researchers had a white whale on their hands who tried to imitate human speech. And along the way, I noted that the art and architecture collective Ant Farm had advocated the creation of dolphin embassies to facilitate cross-species communication. 

Well, the Media Burn video archive sent over this little clip of Ant Farmer Doug Michels, the architect of the embassy idea. It reminded me that Michel's ultimate plan was a dolphin habitat IN SPACE. The dream was called Bluestar and it is about the most awesomely crazy idea I've ever heard. A ring of laboratories and places to think would surround a sphere of water that contained a population of dolphins who programmed a supercomputer with "their sophisticated sonar systems." 

The clip itself is a mishmash of an old Japanese TV show and then a demo video for the Bluestar concept. You will love it. It's as if everything that has ever appeared on BoingBoing got put through an extruder and then lovingly rolled into a delicious contentball.
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Alexis C. Madrigal

Alexis Madrigal is a senior editor at The Atlantic, where he oversees the Technology Channel. He's the author of Powering the Dream: The History and Promise of Green Technology. More

The New York Observer calls Madrigal "for all intents and purposes, the perfect modern reporter." He co-founded Longshot magazine, a high-speed media experiment that garnered attention from The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and the BBC. While at Wired.com, he built Wired Science into one of the most popular blogs in the world. The site was nominated for best magazine blog by the MPA and best science Web site in the 2009 Webby Awards. He also co-founded Haiti ReWired, a groundbreaking community dedicated to the discussion of technology, infrastructure, and the future of Haiti.

He's spoken at Stanford, CalTech, Berkeley, SXSW, E3, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and his writing was anthologized in Best Technology Writing 2010 (Yale University Press).

Madrigal is a visiting scholar at the University of California at Berkeley's Office for the History of Science and Technology. Born in Mexico City, he grew up in the exurbs north of Portland, Oregon, and now lives in Oakland.

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