An Energy Entrepreneur Turns to Inflatable Robots

And really, who could complain?

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If you've been following this special report on energy entrepreneurs, you might remember Makani Windpower, a company we profiled a couple of months ago that's making flying wind turbines. One of its co-founders, Saul Griffith, is an inventor and thinker of considerable acclaim, netting MacArthur genius award and a New Yorker profile. He left the company a few years back and has been working on many other projects since. 


Griffith's latest endeavor, though, may be his most fun idea since generating power with kites. This time around, his company Otherlab is creating inflatable robots that may be more energy efficient than their conventional counterparts. 
 
In the gorgeous video, you can see the early stages of this wild new idea along with a stirring call for engineers to own the impacts of their work. Griffith hasn't left energy entrepreneurship. Otherlab received a $250,000 grant from ARPA-E. "OtherLab will receive $250,000 for a project to work on a high-pressure natural gas tank that uses small diameter tubes tightly wound into a tank shape -- "intestine" like, they described it in the release," GigaOm reported.
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