'We Took a Rat Apart and Rebuilt It as a Jellyfish'

Scientists from Harvard and Caltech announce the creation of a bioengineered, swimming jellyfish made from rat cells.

You begin with an eight-armed silicon membrane. You harvest rat heart-muscle cells and organize them in a disctinct jellyfish-like pattern on your membrane. Lastly, you set your creature free in a vat of fluid, and schock it with electricity. You watch as your "jellyfish" swims away.

Scientists from Harvard and Caltech did just that, and they are calling their rat-celled, bioengineered jellyfish a "medusoid." They hope that by studying its pumping motions, they will be able to extrapolate a better understanding of another pump -- the human heart. Their paper appeared in an advance online version today in Nature Biotechnology.

As Ed Yong reports:

"Morphologically, we've built a jellyfish. Functionally, we've built a jellyfish. Genetically, this thing is a rat," says Kit Parker, a biophysicist at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, who led the work.

...

In 2007, Parker was searching for new ways of studying muscular pumps when he visited the New England Aquarium in Boston, Massachusetts. "I saw the jellyfish display and it hit me like a thunderbolt," he says. "I thought: I know I can build that." To do so, he recruited John Dabiri, a bioengineer who studies biological propulsion at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena. "I grabbed him and said, 'John, I think I can build a jellyfish.' He didn't know who I was, but I was pretty excited and waving my arms, and I think he was afraid to say no."

Janna Nawroth, a graduate student at Caltech who performed most of the experiments, began by mapping every cell in the bodies of juvenile moon jellies (Aurelia aurita) to understand how they swim. A moon jelly's bell consists of a single layer of muscle, with fibres that are tightly aligned around a central ring and along eight spokes.

To make the bell beat downwards, electrical signals spread through the muscle in a smooth wave, "like when you drop a pebble in water", says Parker. "It's exactly like what you see in the heart. My bet is that to get a muscular pump, the electrical activity has got to spread as a wavefront."

Down the road, the team plans to build a medusoid that uses human heart cells, Yong reports. "You've got a heart drug?" Parker told Yong. "You let me put it on my jellyfish, and I'll tell you if it can improve the pumping."

Presented by

Rebecca J. Rosen is a senior editor at The Atlantic, where she oversees the Business Channel. She was previously an associate editor at The Wilson Quarterly.

How to Cook Spaghetti Squash (and Why)

Cooking for yourself is one of the surest ways to eat well. Bestselling author Mark Bittman teaches James Hamblin the recipe that everyone is Googling.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

How to Cook Spaghetti Squash (and Why)

Cooking for yourself is one of the surest ways to eat well.

Video

Before Tinder, a Tree

Looking for your soulmate? Write a letter to the "Bridegroom's Oak" in Germany.

Video

The Health Benefits of Going Outside

People spend too much time indoors. One solution: ecotherapy.

Video

Where High Tech Meets the 1950s

Why did Green Bank, West Virginia, ban wireless signals? For science.

Video

Yes, Quidditch Is Real

How J.K. Rowling's magical sport spread from Hogwarts to college campuses

Video

Would You Live in a Treehouse?

A treehouse can be an ideal office space, vacation rental, and way of reconnecting with your youth.

More in Technology

Just In